My cell group is studying Galatians 5:22 where the fruits of the spirit are identified. I am new to this kind of bible study. We are to report back to the cell members what we have learned about this scripture. My question is do I pray about the message in this scripture and report back what I feel the Lord has told me in this scripture or do I search through the bible for examples of scripture identifying these fruits of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self control? If you were charged to bible study what would you do?

It is always appropriate to pray when one is studying the scriptures.  Bible study should always be prayerfully approached.  You should ask God's guidance as you study, keep an open mind and seek to truly learn what the Bible has to say on a given subject that you might be enlightened and not just to prove some point of doctrine you may hold.

Some good basic Bible study tools would be of good help such as a Bible concordance, a good topical Bible (it has all the scriptures pertaining to given subjects together), a good dictionary, as well as a good Bible dictionary.  You might also compare the renderings in two or three different translations, not that they would teach different things, but they might help enlighten you on a given word or phrase that you might miss with only a single translation at hand.  I would by all means search out what the scriptures have to say about the different kinds of fruit mentioned in Galatians 5:22.


What Bible translation do you recommend and can I trust?

If one loses their salvation, do they have to repent each time? Do
they have to be rebaptized since both are required to be saved?

Of the current translations of the Bible, I would most highly recommend the New King James Version.  The language has been made current and it is reliable.  The American Standard Version is a very good translation but it is not longer being printed.  Most of the more recent versions such as the RSV and the NIV have some doctrinal errors in the text.

Any time one is aware of having sinned one needs to repent and ask God for forgiveness.  One does not lose one's salvation except when one refuses to repent and turn back to God.  No, one does not have to be rebaptized when one sins.  Baptism that is preceded by faith, repentance and confession of faith removes all past sins, and puts one into Christ at the same time.  Once a person becomes a child of God he will always be a child of God, but he can so sin as to fall from God's grace (favor) thus resulting in being disinherited or lost unless there is true repentance.  One never has to be baptized a second time as subsequent sin does not negate one's baptism.


How should the Bible be read, cover to cover or certain chapters first?

The answer to this question depends upon what one wants to do.  One may merely be interested in reading through the Bible.  There are many people who begin at Genesis and read all the way to Revelation.  Not only that, they make an attempt to read the whole Bible through in a yearís time.  However, if one wants to do more in-depth study, the type study that would really be more profitable, then a much shorter portion of scripture should be studied.  This would enable one to better comprehend what one is studying and make practical application.  And, after all, it is the living out of scripture that one must do, not merely be able to say one has read through the scriptures a certain number of times. 

The following is a list of steps that can help when one is studying the Bible.

1) Have a set time to study.  Get into the habit of regular daily study.  This will be easier if one sets aside a certain time each day to study. 

2) Have a set place to study.  A place is needed where the Bible and study helps can easily be laid out.  It needs to be a place away from distractions, for instance, not in front of the television. 

3) Have a prayer to begin the study.  Ask Godís blessing as you get into His word so that you will understand what He is saying through the written word. 

4) Have a limit to what you study.  It may be a chapter, a paragraph, a topic, or a person.  Donít try to cover too much at one time.  Whatever is chosen let it be small enough that you can try to get a handle on it. 

5) Have some tools to help you study.  A good dictionary will help you define words you donít understand.  As time or money allows, get a concordance (lists scriptures by key words), topical Bible (list scriptures by topic), Bible dictionary and maybe a commentary. 

6) Have a pencil and pad when you study.  You will want to make notes, or as you may think of a question you want to answer then or at your next study time you can write it down. 

7) Pray when you finish your study.  Thank God for His word and the time to study, and again ask for His help in understanding and applying it to your life. 

8) Be determined to do what you have studied. 

Then here are some approaches to what to read and study.  Begin with one of the gospels, perhaps Mark since it is the shortest.  This will help you get a picture of the life of Christ, how He lived and why He came.  Then move to Acts.  This deals with the beginning of the church and how people were converted.  Next go to James.  This is a practical book on daily Christian living.  You might then go to the Old Testament and study some in Psalms and Proverbs.  When studying these books, though, keep in mind that they are Hebrew poetry, so you need to read and study them a little differently.  Follow this with some studies in Ephesians and Philippians.  These two books combine both doctrine and practicality, but they are short and can be covered in a relatively short period of time.


What is the difference between the New King James version and the old King James version of the Bible?

The KJV is a 1611 translation authorized by King James of England. At that
time the translators stated that it was not their purpose "to make a new
translation...but to make a good one better." Indebted to the earlier work
of William Tyndale and others, they sought to revise and enhance the
excellence of the English versions which had sprung from the Reformation of
the sixteenth century. The scholars, translators and editors of the NKJV
see their work as a continuation of the labors of the earlier translators.
That is "to make a good one better."
Our language, like all living languages, has undergone profound change
since 1611, The NKJV is an effort to keep abreast of changes in English
speech.
The NKJV is generally accepted as a good and accurate translation of the
original text.


What is the best translation (most accurate) of the bible? I have been
studying with Jehovah's witnesses using the new world translation, and I
believe it to be very accurate. is there a more accurate one that you
know of ?  If so, how do you know this?

It is my belief the most accurate English translation of the Bible is the American Standard Version, published in 1901. Why? Because it is closes to the Greek text used in the New Testament. It is difficult to find, however because the copyright has run out and publishers have brought out new modern translation which sell better. Another good translation is the New King James. It is very accurate and easy to read.


What is the best way to study the Bible?

The best way that I have found to study the Bible is described in Acts
17:11, "These were more noble...in that they received the word with all
readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things
were so."


Iím searching for happiness within, and a knowledge of the Bible. Iím tired of running. My question is how do I begin to read the Bible? Where will I get some understanding? I normally donít read anything, but I want to learn more of the Bible.

Happiness within begins with a right relationship with God. Most certainly that begins with a knowledge of Him. In Romans 1:18-32 the Bible describes those who turned away from a knowledge of God and the resulting sin, depravity and unhappiness that came as a result. To get to know God Ė what He is like, His great love for man, how to have a relationship with Him, how to live a life that is pleasing to Him Ė all this is found within His word. The following is a list of steps that can help you in your study. 

1) Have a set time to study. Get into the habit of regular daily study. This will be easier if you set aside a certain time each day to study. 

2) Have a set place to study. You need a place where your Bible and study helps can easily be laid out. It needs to be a place away from distractions, for instance, not in front of the television. 

3) Have a prayer to begin your study. Ask God to bless you as you get into His word so that you will understand what He is saying through the written word. 

4) Have a limit to what you study. It may be a chapter, a paragraph, a topic, or a person. Donít try to cover too much at one time. Whatever you choose, let it be small enough that you can try to get a handle on it. 

5) Have some tools to help you study. A good dictionary will help you define words you donít understand. As time or money allows get a concordance (lists scriptures by key words), topical Bible (list scriptures by topic), Bible dictionary and maybe a commentary. 

6) Have a pencil and pad when you study. You will want to make notes, or as you may think of a question you want to answer then or at your next study time you can write it down. 

7) Pray when you finish your study. Not only thank God for His word and the time to study, but again ask for His help in understanding and applying it to your life. 

8) Be determined to do what you have studied. It doesnít do any good to read and study if you arenít willing to obey.

Then here are some approaches to what to read and study. Use the New King James or New American Standard Versions. These are accurate translations in more up-to-date language. Begin with one of the gospels, perhaps Mark since it is the shortest. This will help you get a picture of the life of Christ, how He lived and why He came. Then move to Acts. This deals with the beginning of the church and how people were converted. Next go to James. This is a practical book on daily Christian living. You might then go to the Old Testament and study some in Psalms and Proverbs. When studying these books, though, keep in mind that they are Hebrew poetry, so you need to read and study them a little differently. Follow this with some studies in Ephesians and Philippians. These two books combine both doctrine and practicality, but they are short and can be covered in a relatively short period of time. 

This should get you started, and as you gain experience and confidence in your studying you can move to some of the more difficult books. Get into the word; your life will be richly blessed.


What is a good way to study the Bible?

 

The Bible is the inspired, infallible, authoritative, and complete revelation from God to man. It is a book that must be studied by all who are in search of the truth. The study of the Bible should be conducted in an orderly, systematic way, with open mind, and a deep, burning desire to know the truth. Jesus said, "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." (John 8:32.)

There are many good and profitable ways that one might use in studying the Bible. The purpose of your study would certainly have some influence on the most helpful method one would choose for studying the Bible.

As we begin a study of the Bible, it is helpful to get an overall view of it in its entirety. The Bible is like a mountain that must be viewed from all viewpoints and angles before it can be fully appreciated. We must consider the context in which each passage is found. Always keep in mind the theme of the entire Bible- God’s scheme of human redemption. As you read the individual sixty-six books of the Bible, look for the theme or central point of each book. It is helpful to ask the following questions as you read: Who is speaking? To whom is he speaking? And, about whom or what is the passage speaking?

The following suggestions may be of further help in your study:

  1.  
    1. Select a good translation with print that is easily read.
    2. Read it naturally, that is, read it as you would any other book ancient or modern.
    3. Read it remembering that all truth is harmonious and that God being its author will at last make it plain to you.
    4. Read it with a prayerful heart, with a teachable mind, and a broken and contrite spirit.
    5. Read it with a determination to do what it says. You cannot understand it otherwise.
    6. Read it, not to prove a preconceived idea or to justify some act of yours, but to learn the truth, whatever it may be.

Does the Bible really have all the answers?

 

The Bible supplies an answer to all our spiritual needs and questions. It is our authority in religion for all matters of faith and practice. The authority is specific with reference to the things God has commanded of us. The authority for religious practices is sometimes generic in nature. In these instances we are given a background command for the thing to be done without any instructions as to how the thing is to be done. In these matters we have options as to "how" to do the thing being commanded. The New Testament is God’s will for this present age. The apostle Peter wrote, "According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness," (2 Peter 1:3a). The apostle Paul wrote of the completeness of the sacred scriptures, :All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works." (2 Timothy 3:16-17.


Is the Bible the final authority?

 

The Bible is God’s complete and final revelation to man. God has spoken to all mankind in these last days through Jesus Christ by means of the New Testament. (Hebrews 1:1-2.)

The words of Christ as given to us by inspiration through His apostles and prophets give us God’s final message. The New Testament of Jesus Christ will be the standard by which all religious belief and practice will be judged. Jesus said, "He that rejecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that judgeth him: the word that I have spoken, the same shall judge him in the last day." (John 12:48.)

There was not to be any latter day revelations beyond the apostolic age. The apostle of Christ wrote by inspiration, "I marvel that ye are so soon removed from him that called you into the grace of Christ unto another gospel: Which is not another; but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the gospel of Christ. But though we or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed. As we said before, so say I now again, If any man preach any other gospel unto you than that ye have received, let him be assursed." (Galatians 1:6-9.)


What suggestions can you give for guiding a family Bible study, involving a child or children?

 

This is an extremely important thing for families to do. It helps the children in several ways. For one, it helps the child see the parents engaged in the study of God’s word, thus setting the right example for the children. Then, it naturally exposes the child to the study of God’s word, and along with that, it gives the child the opportunity to ask questions. Finally, it helps get the child in the habit of regular Bible study.

To have a family Bible study, I would offer the following suggestions: 1) Have a set time for the devotional. With our busy families it can sometimes be difficult to arrange a time when everyone can be present or isn’t in a hurry to go somewhere. Some families have found that arranging something around the evening meal can a good time. Usually everyone is present, and it is before everyone begins his or her evening activities. 2) For little children, you might try reading the Bible and then paraphrasing it, and you also might try reading from a book of Bible stories along with what you read from the Bible. This will be something more on their level and easier for them to understand. When the children are older, say kindergarten to first grade, begin reading directly from the Bible. Make a few comments, have a question or two prepared to ask, and allow them to ask questions. 3) Have a prayer this is more than thanking God for the family and the food. Pray about things that relate to the family and the church. Help them to understand that one can talk to God about all things. 4) As the children get older, urge them to read and study the Bible on their own, in addition to the family study time.